CCHF | Solutions

H & D

On Mental Illness

From the Princeton, New Jersey publication Revisions: A Journal of Christian Perspective, Dr. David Chen writes an excellent article about mental illness.  A short excerpt from the original publication of the Spring 2009 issue of Revisions follows:

"Perhaps what we fear the most about death, disease, and mental illness is the way they illuminate the lack of control we have over our lives. We are but vapors in the wind, and such reminders about our relative powerlessness over the most important things in life—love and death –are galling, provocative, and humbling conclusions. In the case of the villagers and the disciples, the loss of that control to the hands of Christ, even when wielded with healing and peace, still struck them with terror.

Small wonder that, despite our lip service to the contrary, we are content to fend off the horrors of our bodies and minds with vain and ineffective means. Even if we were offered the cures to all our diseases and the restoration of our mental faculties, would we be willing to yield our own autonomy and authority to such an unknown and unbreakable deity? Would we ever want admit that we rejected such promise?

Small wonder that we crucified him."

 You can check it out the article in its entirety here

Where Poor and Uninsured Americans Live.

The 26 states not participating in an expansion of Medicaid are home to a disproportionate share of the nation’s poorest uninsured residents. Eight million will be stranded without insurance.

From the Princeton, New Jersey publication Revisions: A Journal of Christian Perspective, Dr. David Chen writes an excellent article about mental illness.  A short exceprt from the original publication of the Spring 2009 issue of Revisions follows:

"Perhaps what we fear the most about death, disease, and mental illness is the way they illuminate the lack of control we have over our lives. We are but vapors in the wind, and such reminders about our relative powerlessness over the most important things in life—love and death –are galling, provocative, and humbling conclusions. In the case of the villagers and the disciples, the loss of that control to the hands of Christ, even when wielded with healing and peace, still struck them with terror.

Small wonder that, despite our lip service to the contrary, we are content to fend off the horrors of our bodies and minds with vain and ineffective means. Even if we were offered the cures to all our diseases and the restoration of our mental faculties, would we be willing to yield our own autonomy and authority to such an unknown and unbreakable deity? Would we ever want admit that we rejected such promise?

Small wonder that we crucified him."

 You can check it out the article in it's entirety here