CCHF | Solutions

H & D

The New Health & Development

Dear CCHF family,

Welcome to the first electronic-only issue of Health and Development (H&D). Over thirty years ago, CCHF’s founders recognized the need for Christians working among the poor to exchange ideas and experiences. Since the first issue was published in 1979, H&D has been shepherded by a series of able editors, including Lance Loberg, David Caes, Jerry Stromberg, and, most recently, Steve Noblett. 

For at least the next year, Wayne Detmer and I will be responsible for producing H&D, with Jason Stevens continuing to contribute his considerable design and formatting talents. The three of us are making changes that we hope will make the journal more accessible and interactive. We intend to produce three issues a year in an electronic-only format. If interest and finances permit, we’ll assemble an annual print version containing the year’s best and most commented-on articles.  

We’re working through CCHF’s fabulous new website and other social media to make H&D available to an audience broader than our traditional subscription list. We’re hopeful that if you read something in H&D that’s inspiring, challenging, or controversial, you’ll comment on it and share it with your friends and colleagues. 

This issue is exclusively about the first tenet of CCHF founder, John Perkins’ “Three Rs”: relocation. The board and staff of CCHF recognize that only a minority of CCHFers live in the communities where they serve. Having said that, our mission statement says we’re about “living out the gospel through healthcare among the poor”. How important is physical relocation to achieving our mission?

We asked five people at various stages of relocating to write about their thinking and experiences. Elliot Shin is a family physician and single parent in Las Vegas who’s in the exuberant “I’m ready to do this” stage. Laura Jackson lives in Fort Worth, TX, where she teaches school and her husband is a medical resident. A year ago, they moved into an apartment complex where refugees and immigrants were being resettled. Steven Euler, an internal medicine doc, recently moved into New Orleans’ ravaged ninth ward, where he’s part of a new health center startup. Janine Noble is a single woman and a PA, living in the historic Orange Mound community of Memphis. Lastly, Rob Werner and his family have lived in Chicago’s Lawndale community for over twenty years. 

We hope you’ll read them all, comment and converse about those that make you nod or frown, and pass them on to your electronic friends. 


Rick Donlon, MD



Welcome to the first electronic-only issue of Health and Development (H&D). Over thirty years ago, CCHF’s founders recognized the need for Christians working among the poor to exchange ideas and experiences. Since the first issue was published in 1979, H&D has been shepherded by a series of able editors, including Lance Loberg, David Caes, Jerry Stromberg, and, most recently, Steve Noblett.